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AP Psychology
AP Psychology
Prologue
Prologue
Chapter One:  Thinking Critically
Chapter One: Thinking Critically
Chapter Two: Neuroscience and Behavior
Chapter Two: Neuroscience and Behavior
Chapter Three: Nature, Nurture and Human Diversity
Chapter Three: Nature, Nurture and Human Diversity
Chapter Four: Developing Through the Life Span
Chapter Four: Developing Through the Life Span
Chapter Five:  Sensation
Chapter Five: Sensation
Chapter Six: Perception
Chapter Six: Perception
Chapter Seven: States of Consciousness
Chapter Seven: States of Consciousness
Chapter Eight:  Learning
Chapter Eight: Learning
Chapter Nine:  Memory
Chapter Nine: Memory
Chapter Ten: Thinking and Language
Chapter Ten: Thinking and Language
Chapter Eleven: Intelligence
Chapter Eleven: Intelligence
Chapter Twelve: Motivation and Work
Chapter Twelve: Motivation and Work
Chapter Thirteen: Emotion
Chapter Thirteen: Emotion
Chapter Fourteen: Stress and Health
Chapter Fourteen: Stress and Health
Chapter Fifteen: Personality
Chapter Fifteen: Personality
Chapter Sixteen: Psychological Disorders
Chapter Sixteen: Psychological Disorders
Chapter Seventeen: Therapy
Chapter Seventeen: Therapy
Chapter Eighteen: Social Psychology
Chapter Eighteen: Social Psychology

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Chapter Four: Developing Through the Life Span Chapter Four: Developing Through the Life Span
Chapter Four Objectives

Chapter 4

 

 

Objective 1 | State the three areas of change that developmental psychologists study, and identify the three major issues in developmental psychology. 

 

Objective 2| Describe the union of sperm and egg at conception. 

 

Objective 3| Define zygote, embryo, and fetus, and explain how teratogens can affect development. 

 

Objective 4| Describe some abilities of the newborn, and explain how researchers use habituation to assess infant sensory and cognitive abilities. 

 

Objective 5| Describe some developmental changes in a child’s brain, and explain why maturation accounts for many of our similarities. 

 

Objective 6| Outline four events in the motor development sequence from birth to toddlerhood, and evaluate the effects of maturation and experience on that sequence. 

Objective 7| Explain why we have few memories of experiences during our first three years of life. 

 

Objective 8| State Piaget’s understanding of how the mind develops, and discuss the importance of assimilation and accommodation in this process. 

 

Objective 9| Outline Piaget’s four main stages of cognitive development, and comment on how children’s thinking changes during these four stages. 

 

Objective 10| Discuss psychologists’ current views on Piaget’s theory of cognitive development.

Objective 11| Define stranger anxiety.

 

Objective 12| Discuss the effects of nourishment, body contact, and familiarity on infant social attachment.

Objective 13| Contrast secure and insecure attachment, and discuss the roles of parents and infants in the development of attachment and an infant’s feelings of basic trust. 

Objective 14| Assess the impact of parental neglect, family disruption, and day care on attachment patterns and development. 

 

Objective 15| Trace the onset and development of children’s self-concept.


 

Objective 16| Describe three parenting styles, and offer three potential explanations for the link between authoritative parenting and social competence. 

 

Objective 17| Define adolescence. 

 

Objective 18| Identify the major physical changes during adolescence.

 

Objective 19| Describe the changes in reasoning abilities that Piaget called formal operations.

Objective 20| Discuss moral development from the perspectives of moral thinking, moral feeling, and moral action.

 

Objective  21| Identify Erikson’s eight stages of psychosocial development and their accompanying issues. 

 

Objective 22| Explain how the search for identity affects us during adolescence, and discuss how forming an identity prepares us for intimacy.

 

Objective 23| Contrast parental and peer influences during adolescence. 

 

Objective 24| Discuss the characteristics of emerging adulthood. 

Objective 25| Identify the major physical changes that occur in middle adulthood. 

 

Objective 26| Compare life expectancy in the mid-twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, and discuss changes in sensory abilities and health (including frequency of dementia) in older adults. 

 Pages: 177-181

 

Objective 27| Assess the impact of aging on recall and recognition in adulthood. 

 

Objective 28| Summarize the contributions of cross-sectional and longitudinal studies to our understanding of the normal effects of aging on adult intelligence. 

 

Objective 29| Explain why the path of adult development need not be tightly linked to one’s chronological age.

 

Objective 30| Discuss the importance of love, marriage, and children in adulthood, and comment on the contribution of one’s work to feelings of self-satisfaction.

 

Objective 31| Describe trends in people’s life satisfaction across the life span. 

Objective 32| Describe the range of reactions to the death of loved one. 

 

Objective 33| Summarize current views on continuity versus stages and stability versus change in lifelong development. 





Ms Hitchcock